DMAPS under construction – new data sets to be released on February 21
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Overview

Digital Learning Tab: This current tab provides information and links related to digital learning plans and standards, the adoption of computer science standards and state definitions for personalized learning. Visit the Instructional Materials, Procurement and Professional Learning Tabs for more information on this state.

DIGITAL LEARNING PLANS & STANDARDS

State Digital Learning Plan

Massachusetts does not have a state digital learning plan.

State Requirements for District Digital Learning Plans

Massachusetts does not have requirements for districts for digital learning plans.

In Massachusetts, stand-alone technology plans are not required; rather, the process and documentation of technology planning is built into LEA and school improvement plans and capital plans.

Digital Learning Standards for Students

Massachusetts has digital learning standards for students.

The Digital Literacy and Computer Science (DLCS) Curriculum Framework addresses core concepts in four key domains (Computing and Society, Digital Tools and Collaboration, Computing Systems, and Computational Thinking); integrate practices necessary to successfully act in a technological world; present coherent progressions of core concepts and practices from grades K to 12; and complement other Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

State Personalized Learning Definition

Massachusetts does not have a unique state definition for personalized learning.

Personalized learning seeks to accelerate student learning by tailoring the instructional environment – what, when, how and where students learn – to address the individual needs, skills and interests of each student. Within a framework of established curriculum standards and high expectations, personalized learning motivates students to reach their goals. Students take ownership of their own learning and develop deep, personal connections with each other, their teachers and other adults. Technology is a necessary, but not sufficient, element to implement personalized learning effectively, affordably, and at significant scale. Teachers leverage technology to gain detailed and timely knowledge of their students that guides instruction. Effective use of technology allows teachers and students to focus more on creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration.

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last update: 7:06 am 02/13/19
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Overview

Massachusetts is developing a strategy to provide schools and districts with the information and support they need to provide teachers with access to high-quality, standards-aligned curricular materials and to ensure the existence of sustainable and collaborative professional learning structures to help teachers use those materials to orchestrate student learning experiences skillfully.

Districts have the authority to procure and use digital instructional materials. Districts may purchase devices through statewide contracts and fund purchases for devices and/or digital instructional materials through public or private sources. The state has partnered with some organizations to provide digital instructional materials free of charge to educators and communicates the availability of such offerings through channels such as Twitter, the Commissioner’s Weekly Update, the Office of Digital Learning newsletter, and targeted emails.

Definitions

Definition for Instructional Materials

Massachusetts has a definition for instructional materials/textbook.

Curricular materials are resources teachers use to orchestrate sequences of student learning experiences: lesson and unit plans, texts in various formats, and more.

Includes

OER

Definition for Open Educational Resources

Massachusetts has a definition for open educational resources.

Open educational resources (OER) are learning materials freely available under a license that allows them to be reused, revised, remixed, and redistributed.

Definition for Accessible Educational Materials

Massachusetts has a definition for accessible educational materials. The definition is based on

Federal Definition

Definition for Accessible Technologies

Massachusetts has a definition for accessible technologies. The definition is based on

AEM Definition

Guidelines and Policies

State Statute - Instructional Materials Adoption

Massachusetts does not have a statute for the adoption of instructional materials.

State Statute - Requires Implementation of Digital Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have a statute requiring the implementation of digital instructional materials.

State Statute - Allows Implementation of Digital Instructional Materials

Massachusetts has a statute allowing the implementation of digital instructional materials.

Massachusetts law states that the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education may “review and recommend instructional materials which it judges to be compatible with the curriculum frameworks [learning standards]” (M.G.L.ch.69§1E).

State Statute - Online Course Requirement

Massachusetts does not have a statute requiring students to take an online course prior to graduation.

Guidance Outside of School

Massachusetts provides guidance to LEAs in the use of digital instructional materials outside of the classroom.

The SEA provides guidance to help educators plan for learning environments that feature (1) a one to one model (1:1), in which school-owed devices are loaned to all students, which may or may not be allowed home; or (2) a “bring your own device” model (BYOD), in which students are encouraged to bring a personal device to and from school, while providing a school-owned device to students who choose not to bring a personal device. Legal FAQs are also provided.

Guidance Selection Accessible Digital Instructional Materials

Yes, our state provides information, examples or guidelines to LEAs to support the selection and acquisition of accessible digital instructional materials.

The SEA provides an Assistive Technology and Accessible Instructional Materials guide and web-based resources to support the implementation of accessible educational materials.

Guidance Selection Accessible Technologies

Yes, our state provides information, examples or guidelines to LEAs to support the selection and acquisition of accessible digital instructional materials.

Guidance Inclement Weather

Massachusetts provides guidance to districts for possible solutions to scheduling issues posed by inclement weather.

The SEA developed a memorandum to assist school committees and charter school boards of trustees with the development of “alternative structured learning day programs” as possible solutions to scheduling issues posed by inclement weather so the minimum student learning time requirement of 900 hours for elementary schools, 990 hours for secondary schools, and a total of 180 days may be met.

State Review Process

Review of Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have a process for the review of instructional materials.

CUrriculum RAtings by TEachers (CURATE) is an SEA-led initiative to identify high-quality curricular materials aligned to Massachusetts standards. Beginning in fall 2018, the SEA is convening panels of Massachusetts teachers to review and rate evidence on the quality and alignment of specific curricular materials. Reports summarizing the panels’ findings will appear on starting in early 2019. Publishers of curricular materials are invited to submit information on their products for consideration. Products must (a) support a comprehensive (rather than supplemental or intervention) English Language Arts/Literacy, Mathematics, or Science and Technology/Engineering curriculum and (b) determined by a rigorous, educator-driven review (such as EdReports) to meet expectations for alignment to college- and career-ready standards. Submissions meeting these requirements are reviewed by a CURATE panel. Three main sources of evidence inform every CURATE review: (1) rigorous, educator-led reviews of quality and alignment, primarily those available from EdReports; (2) information publishers submit directly to SEA in response to specific prompts, often including sample materials such as lesson plans; and (3) perceptual data from Massachusetts teachers who have experience working with the materials under review. Panelists look for triangulation, valuing findings supported by more than one of these varied data sources. Rubrics each have two domains: standards alignment and classroom application. Standards alignment references the Massachusetts learning standards and the curriculum frameworks that contain them. Classroom application, informed by the state’s Model Teacher Evaluation Rubric, is composed of three criteria: accessibility for students, usability for teachers, and impact on student learning. Teach Plus and the Rennie Center are working together to support the Department in facilitating the CURATE reviews.

Review of Instructional Materials Outcomes

Massachusetts does not have a process for the review of instructional materials outcomes.

Posting of Reviewed Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not post state reviewed instructional materials.

Districts Required to Purchase State Reviewed Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not require districts to purchase state reviewed instructional materials.

Districts Required to Follow State Review Process

Massachusetts does not require districts to follow the state review process for the review of instructional materials.

Regional Support - Review of Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have an Education Service Agency (ESA) or other regional organization that has a process for the review of instructional materials.

Includes

Regional Support - Posting Reviewed Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have an ESA or other regional organization that posts reviewed instructional materials.

Resource Repositories

Content Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Massachusetts does not have a state hosted content management system or a state master contract for a content management system available to schools and districts.

Learning Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Massachusetts does not have a state hosted learning management system or state master contract for a learning management system available to schools and districts.

State Resource Repository

Massachusetts does not have a state resource repository.

Educators and other interested parties may use the Standards Navigator to search standards by subject and narrow down the results by various levels, or search for a keyword(s) in standard/levels and narrow down the results by subject(s)/grade. The tool displays resources associated with specific standards within the context of specific standards and grade levels.

Funding

Dedicated State Funding

Massachusetts does not have dedicated state funding.

LEAs fund the purchase of digital instructional materials with general state funds and/or local initiatives.

Funding - District Options

Use local funds

Collaborate with other districts

Partner with non-profits

Leverage state purchasing contracts

last update: 7:06 am 02/13/19
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Overview

In general, the SEA does not procure resources for LEAs. LEAs retain the authority to procure and use digital instructional materials. LEAs may purchase devices through statewide contracts and fund purchases for devices and/or digital instructional materials through public or private sources. The SEA has partnered with some organizations to provide free modular digital instructional materials that address topics such as digital citizenship and financial literacy.

Guidance – Publishers

Massachusetts does not have procurement guidelines for companies interested in selling instructional materials in the state.

Vendors register to sell through COMMBUYS, a state-of-the-art electronic Market Center to support online commerce between government purchasers and business.

Guidance – Publishers - Accessibility Features

Massachusetts has guidelines for commercial and OER publishers, developers, and vendors related to accessibility features in products/services.

Specific accessibility requirements must be included in contracts for state agency information technology systems to ensure they can be used by people with disabilities. LEAs must follow federal and any local guidelines.

Request for Proposals/Request for Information

Massachusetts does not have a request for proposals/request for information process.

State Master Contract - Contract with State

Massachusetts does not have state master contract available for district and schools to make purchases directly with the state.

Includes

Devices

State Master Contract - Contract with Publisher

Massachusetts does not have state master contract available for district and schools to make purchases directly with the publisher.

State Pricing Negotiation

Massachusetts does not negotiate prices with publishers, vendors during the RFP/RFI process, and districts may purchase the materials directly from the vendor.

Manage Regional Purchasing Consortia

Massachusetts manages regional groups that participate in regional purchasing consortia for instructional materials.

Educational Collaboratives are educational service agencies that work with LEAs and schools to develop programs and services to enhance operating efficiency, which may include forming regional purchasing consortia.

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Overview

Massachusetts has a six-pronged strategy for supporting the use of high-quality, standards-aligned curricular materials: (1) communicate and educate about curricular materials, (2) signal alignment and quality of curricular materials, (3) support strong decision-making about curricular materials, (4) support effective implementation of curricular materials, (5) work with selected districts directly and intensively, and (6) align the work of the state education agency. Specifically, the SEA is facilitating teacher panels to review evidence on the quality and alignment of commonly used curricular materials in literacy, mathematics, and science and technology/engineering; developing guidance for districts to investigate the knowledge students are building through texts throughout their PK-12 schooling, starting with high school; developing professional learning networks that support districts to implement cycles of inquiry; and supporting districts through curriculum audits, analyses of middle school English Language Arts assignments, and pilots of open source middle school science curricular materials.

Selection of Digital Instructional Materials

Massachusetts provides professional learning opportunities to support teachers in the selection of quality digital instructional materials (licensed and/or OER) to use in the classroom.

Beginning in fall 2018, the SEA is convening panels of Massachusetts teachers to review and rate evidence on the quality and alignment of specific curricular materials. All panelists are current PK-12 classroom teachers in Massachusetts public schools. Candidates undergo a multi-step application and interview process and obtain written support from their districts before being selected. Diversity is a priority: representation from a variety of geographical regions, district and school types, career stages and experiences, and cultural and demographic groups. Experts in special education and English learner education sit on every panel.

Includes

Licensed digital

Digital OER

Implementation of Digital Instructional Materials

Massachusetts provides professional learning opportunities to support teachers in the selection of quality digital instructional materials (licensed and/or OER) to use in the classroom.

In addition to providing professional development through in-person networks, the SEA is partnering with Teach Plus and the Rennie Center to support professional learning.

Includes

Statewide professional learning for teachers via webinars

Statewide professional learning for teachers via a online community

Statewide professional learning for teachers in-person

Statewide conference

Development of Professional Learning Programs

Massachusetts develops its own professional learning programs.

Our state develops their own professional learning programs

Our state partners with consultants to develop professional learning program

Our state hires outside consultants to develop professional learning programs

Development of OER

Massachusetts does not provide professional learning opportunities to support the development of digital OER.

Share OER

Massachusetts does not provide professional learning opportunities for teachers to share of digital OER

Professional Learning - Accessibility

No, our state does not provide professional learning to support the implementation of accessible educational materials.

Technical Assistance - Accessible Instructional/Educational Materials

No, our state does not provide technical assistance to support the implementation of accessible instructional/educational materials

Technical Assistance - Accessible Technologies

No, our state does not provide technical assistance to support the use of accessible technologies.