REQUEST CHANGES

Overview

The Digital Instructional Materials Acquisition Policies for States (DMAPS) is an online database providing state and territory policies and practices related to the acquisition of digital instructional materials in K12 education and includes three sections.

  • At-a-Glance Tab: This current tab provides information and links to state digital learning plans, state requirements for district digital learning plans and whether states have digital learning standards for students.
  • Instructional Materials Tab: Visit the Instructional Materials tab to learn more about acquisition of instructional materials including definitions, guidelines and policies, state review processes, digital learning resources and funding.
  • Procurement Tab: This tab provides valuable information about state procurement for state and district leaders, as well as companies.

DIGITAL LEARNING PLANS & STANDARDS

State Digital Learning Plan

Washington has a state digital learning plan.

Washington has an independent state level educational technology plan. The state generated a concise update to the 2009 Education Technology Plan for K-12 Public Schools in Washington State in September 2016. With the substantial budget reductions in place during the past and current biennium, Washington has been unable to launch new programming, maintain many existing programs or expand current services.

State Requirements for District Digital Learning Plans

Washington does not have requirements for districts for digital learning plans.

Washington does not require district level educational technology plans, but strongly encourages technology planning. District plans are generally revised every 3 years.

Digital Learning Standards for Students

Washington has digital learning standards for students.

Washington established educational technology standards in 2008, and also developed optional-use classroom-based assessments that districts may use to assess student growth in educational technology.

Request At A Glance data set for all states
last update: 5:40 pm 02/23/18
REQUEST CHANGES

Overview

State laws outline basic education goals and minimal instructional requirements for school districts. They require districts to have policies and procedures in place that guide their selection and adoption of instructional materials for use in classrooms.

OSPI provides a guidance document that models a cyclical strategy for the regular review of courses based on district needs and provides links to state policies, guiding questions, useful resources, and district examples, that help define best practices for considering instructional materials.

OSPI recommends a suite of instructional materials review instruments including EQuIP, IMET, and the Achieve OER Rubrics for use with ALL instructional materials, regardless of delivery platform.

Definitions

Definition for Accessible Instructional/Educational Materials

Washington has a unique definition or references the federal definition for accessible instructional/educational materials.

The Washington State School Directors’ Association has created a model policy in partnership with OSPI: 2020 – Course Design, Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials. All instructional materials are selected at the local school district level, and the state instructional materials toolkit includes link to federal guidance on accessibility.

Definition for Accessible Technologies

Washington does not have a unique definition for accessible technologies or references the AEM definition for accessible technologies.

Although we do not specifically define accessible technologies at the state level, we provide guidance to districts on Universal Design for Learning and other best practices.

Definition for Instructional Materials

Washington has a definition for instructional materials/textbook.

Instructional Materials are all materials designed for use by students and their teachers as learning resources to help students to acquire facts, skills, and/or to develop cognitive processes. These instructional materials, used to help students meet state learning standards, may be printed or digital, and may include textbooks, technology-based materials, other educational media, and assessments. They may carry different licensing types from open to all rights reserved.

Includes

Digital

OER

Definition for Open Educational Resources

Washington has a definition for open educational resources.

Washington follows the Hewlett Foundation definition of OER: teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others. The Washington K-12 OER bill clarifies that open courseware;allows others to use, distribute, and create derivative works based upon the digital material, while still allowing the authors to retain the copyright.

Guidelines and Policies

State Statute - Instructional Materials Adoption

Washington does not have a statute for the adoption of instructional materials.

Instructional materials adoptions happens at the local district level in our state, and while the implementation of digital instructional materials is not required, it is an option for districts to consider.

State Statute - Requires Implementation of Digital Instructional Materials

Washington does not have a statute requiring the implementation of digital instructional materials.

State Statute - Allows Implementation of Digital Instructional Materials

Washington has a statute allowing the implementation of digital instructional materials.

Instructional materials adoptions happens at the local district level in our state, and the implementation of digital instructional materials is an option for districts to consider.

State Statute - Online Course Requirement

Washington does not have a statute requiring students to take an online course prior to graduation.

There is no state requirement for online course-taking, although some districts have chosen to add this requirement locally.

Guidance Outside of School

Washington does not provide guidance to LEAs in the use of digital instructional materials outside of the classroom.

Guidance Accessible Digital Instructional Materials

Washington provides guidance to LEAs to support the use of accessible digital instructional materials for learners with disabilities to improve outcomes.

The Special Education Technology Center (SETC), funded by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), Special Education Division and administered by Central Washington University (CWU) provides technology planning for students, a lending library of technology tools and resources and staff development to support teachers and administrators.

Guidance Accessible Technologies

Washington provides guidance to LEAs to support the use of accessible technologies for learners with disabilities to improve outcomes.

Washington provides support for LEAs regarding the implementation of the the Special Education Technology Center (http://www.specialedtechcenter.org) and via links on Educational Technology pages to accessibilty resources.

Guidance Inclement Weather

Washington does not provide guidance to districts for possible solutions to scheduling issues posed by inclement weather.

State Review Process

Review of Instructional Materials

Washington has a process for the review of instructional materials.

State laws outline basic education goals and minimal instructional requirements for school districts. They require districts to have policies and procedures in place that guide their selection and adoption of instructional materials for use in classrooms.

OSPI provides a guidance document that models a cyclical strategy for the regular review of courses based on district needs and provides links to state policies, guiding questions, useful resources, and district examples, that help define best practices for considering instructional materials.

OSPI recommends a suite of instructional materials review instruments including EQuIP, IMET, and the Achieve OER Rubrics for use with ALL instructional materials, regardless of delivery platform.

Materials Includes

Digital instructional materials

Online content

Software

Supplemental materials

OER

Review of Instructional Materials Outcomes

Washington has a process for the review of instructional materials outcomes.

Evaluated

Posting of Reviewed Instructional Materials

Washington posts state reviewed instructional materials.

Districts Required to Purchase State Reviewed Instructional Materials

Washington does not require districts to purchase state reviewed instructional materials.

Districts Required to Follow State Review Process

Washington does not require districts to follow the state review process for the review of instructional materials.

Regional Support - Review of Instructional Materials

Washington does not have an Education Service Agency (ESA) or other regional organization that has a process for the review of instructional materials.

Includes

Regional Support - Posting Reviewed Instructional Materials

Washington does not have an ESA or other regional organization that posts reviewed instructional materials.

Digital Learning Resources

Content Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Washington does not have a state hosted content management system or a state master contract for a content management system available to schools and districts.

Learning Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Washington does not have a state hosted learning management system or state master contract for a learning management system available to schools and districts.

State Resource Repository

Washington has a state resource repository.

OER Commons Washington Hub: Contains reviewed and developed resources from OSPI, OER Project grantees, and collaborative groups.

Includes

OER

Funding

Dedicated State Funding

Washington does not have dedicated state funding.

Funding - District Options

Use local funds

Collaborate with other districts

Partner with non-profits

Leverage state purchasing contracts

last update: 5:40 pm 02/23/18
REQUEST CHANGES

Overview

In Washington, the procurement of devices and instructional materials is primarily conducted at the local district level. Districts may choose to buy off of state master contracts, as well as make use of optional-buy contracts from several buying consortia, including Digital Edge, Washington Learning Source, and Washington School Information Processing Cooperative. Funding for digital learning resources (DLR) are available through state basic education funding or local bonds or levies.

The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) partnered with the Washington State School Director’s Association (WSSDA) to update the model school board instructional materials policy to better reflect digital materials and OER. Selecting supplemental DLR content is usually a school, department chair or teacher initiated process and there are no state laws restricting local selection and purchase of DLR’s. The WSSDA released an updated model policy and procedure on Course Design, Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials that reflects 21st century instructional materials that include digital resources and OER. This model policy states that the Superintendent or designee may consider the use of field testing as part of the adoption process and this can provide a flexible opportunity to investigate the effectiveness of instructional materials through careful experimentation for an identified purpose based on student needs. In addition, the state has a state level OER initiative which includes a reviewed library of OER curricular materials aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

More Information

Guidance – Publishers

Washington does not have procurement guidelines for companies interested in selling instructional materials in the state.

Guidance – Publishers - Accessibility Features

Washington does not have guidelines for commercial or OER publishers, developers, or vendors related to accessibility features in products/services.

Request for Proposals/Request for Information

Washington does not have a request for proposals/request for information process.

State Master Contract - Contract with State

Washington does not have state master contract available for district and schools to make purchases directly with the state.

State Master Contract - Contract with Publisher

Washington does not have state master contract available for district and schools to make purchases directly with the publisher.

State Pricing Negotiation

Washington does not negotiate prices with publishers, vendors during the RFP/RFI process, and districts may purchase the materials directly from the vendor.

Manage Regional Purchasing Consortia

Washington manages regional groups that participate in regional purchasing consortia for instructional materials.

Digital Edge: Educational Service District 112 currently provides three contracts for Chromebooks and Related Solutions, School Safety Solutions and Educational Technology, Wireless Devices and Audio-Visual Equipment that are competitively bid and made available to the K-12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, regional service agencies and state departments of education in twelve western states.

Washington Learning Source: The Washington Learning Source carries a wide variety of discounted products that fulfill educational needs ranging from antivirus software to online writing evaluation tools.

Washington School Information Processing Cooperative (WSIPC): WSIPC’s Purchasing Program connects educators and public agencies to a network of bid technology partners. Vendors are awarded through an official RFP process.