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Overview

The Digital Instructional Materials Acquisition Policies for States (DMAPS) is an online database providing state and territory policies and practices related to the acquisition of digital instructional materials in K12 education and includes three sections.

  • At-a-Glance Tab: This current tab provides information and links to state digital learning plans, state requirements for district digital learning plans and whether states have digital learning standards for students.
  • Instructional Materials Tab: Visit the Instructional Materials tab to learn more about acquisition of instructional materials including definitions, guidelines and policies, state review processes, digital learning resources and funding.
  • Procurement Tab: This tab provides valuable information about state procurement for state and district leaders, as well as companies.

DIGITAL LEARNING PLANS & STANDARDS

State Digital Learning Plan

Massachusetts does not have a state digital learning plan.

In Massachusetts, stand-alone technology plans are not required; rather, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) encourages local education agencies (LEAs) to incorporate technology planning into the development, communication, and implementation of district and school improvement plans for improving student performance under M.G.L. c. 69, § 1I, and processes related to the planning, design, and construction of adaptable school buildings.

State Requirements for District Digital Learning Plans

Massachusetts does not have requirements for districts for digital learning plans.

In Massachusetts, stand-alone technology plans are not required; rather, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) encourages local education agencies (LEAs) to incorporate technology planning into the development, communication, and implementation of district and school improvement plans for improving student performance under M.G.L. c. 69, § 1I, and processes related to the planning, design, and construction of adaptable school buildings.

Digital Learning Standards for Students

Massachusetts has digital learning standards for students.

The Digital Literacy and Computer Science Framework addresses core concepts in four key domains (Computing and Society, Digital Tools and Collaboration, Computing Systems, and Computational Thinking); integrate practices necessary to successfully act in a technological world; present coherent progressions of core concepts and practices from grades K to 12; and complement other Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

Request At A Glance data set for all states
last update: 5:40 pm 02/23/18
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Overview

Massachusetts is developing a strategy to provide schools and districts with the information and support they need to provide teachers with access to high-quality, standards-aligned curricular materials and to ensure the existence of sustainable and collaborative professional learning structures to help teachers use those materials to orchestrate student learning experiences skillfully.

Districts have the authority to procure and use digital instructional materials. Districts may purchase devices through statewide contracts and fund purchases for devices and/or digital instructional materials through public or private sources. The state has partnered with some organizations to provide digital instructional materials free of charge to educators and communicates the availability of such offerings through channels such as Twitter, the Commissioner’s Weekly Update, the Office of Digital Learning newsletter, and targeted emails.

Definitions

Definition for Accessible Instructional/Educational Materials

Massachusetts has a unique definition or references the federal definition for accessible instructional/educational materials.

Massachusetts uses the federal definition to support the implementation of accessible materials.

Definition for Accessible Technologies

Massachusetts has a unique definition for accessible technologies or references the AEM definition for accessible technologies.

Massachusetts references the AEM Center’s definition for accessible technologies.

Definition for Instructional Materials

Massachusetts has a definition for instructional materials/textbook.

OER are teaching and learning materials that are free and may be used, reused, mixed, and otherwise customized to meet specific needs. Free materials available for students, teachers, schools or districts which are not openly licensed do not have the same level of permitted uses such as adaptation, retention, or wide scale distribution.

Includes

OER

Definition for Open Educational Resources

Massachusetts has a definition for open educational resources.

Open educational resources (OER): learning materials that are freely available under a license that allows them to be: reused, revised, remixed, and redistributed.

Guidelines and Policies

State Statute - Instructional Materials Adoption

Massachusetts does not have a statute for the adoption of instructional materials.

State Statute - Requires Implementation of Digital Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have a statute requiring the implementation of digital instructional materials.

State Statute - Allows Implementation of Digital Instructional Materials

Massachusetts has a statute allowing the implementation of digital instructional materials.

Massachusetts law states that the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education may “review and recommend instructional materials which it judges to be compatible with the curriculum frameworks [learning standards]” (M.G.L.ch.69§1E).

State Statute - Online Course Requirement

Massachusetts does not have a statute requiring students to take an online course prior to graduation.

Guidance Outside of School

Massachusetts provides guidance to LEAs in the use of digital instructional materials outside of the classroom.

The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has developed guidance to help educators plan for learning environments that feature (1) a one to one model (1:1), in which school-owed devices are loaned to all students, which may or may not be allowed home; or (2) a “bring your own device” model (BYOD), in which students are encouraged to bring a personal device to and from school, while providing a school-owned device to students who choose not to bring a personal device. Legal FAQs are also provided.

Guidance Accessible Digital Instructional Materials

Massachusetts provides guidance to LEAs to support the use of accessible digital instructional materials for learners with disabilities to improve outcomes.

Massachusetts publishes an Assistive Technology and Accessible Instructional Materials guide to support LEA and provides as webpages with resources to support the implementation of accessible educational materials. http://www.doe.mass.edu/sped/assistive/nimas.html

Guidance Accessible Technologies

Massachusetts provides guidance to LEAs to support the use of accessible technologies for learners with disabilities to improve outcomes.

The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education provides guidance to assist districts in complying with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. The guidance addresses considering a student’s possible need for assistive technology devices and services whenever an Individualized Education Program (IEP) is developed; the provision of assistive technology for students with disabilities, if needed to assure equal access to the school’s programs and services; and the provision of instructional materials in accessible formats to students who need them.

Guidance Inclement Weather

Massachusetts provides guidance to districts for possible solutions to scheduling issues posed by inclement weather.

The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has developed a memorandum to assist school committees and charter school boards of trustees with the development of “alternative structured learning day programs” as possible solutions to scheduling issues posed by inclement weather so the minimum student learning time requirement of 900 hours for elementary schools, 990 hours for secondary schools, and a total of 180 days may be met.

State Review Process

Review of Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have a process for the review of instructional materials.

Massachusetts is developing a strategy to provide schools and districts with the information and support they need to provide teachers with access to high-quality, standards-aligned curricular materials and to ensure the existence of sustainable and collaborative professional learning structures to help teachers use those materials to orchestrate student learning experiences skillfully.

Review of Instructional Materials Outcomes

Massachusetts does not have a process for the review of instructional materials outcomes.

Posting of Reviewed Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not post state reviewed instructional materials.

Districts Required to Purchase State Reviewed Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not require districts to purchase state reviewed instructional materials.

Districts Required to Follow State Review Process

Massachusetts does not require districts to follow the state review process for the review of instructional materials.

Regional Support - Review of Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have an Education Service Agency (ESA) or other regional organization that has a process for the review of instructional materials.

Regional Support - Posting Reviewed Instructional Materials

Massachusetts does not have an ESA or other regional organization that posts reviewed instructional materials.

Digital Learning Resources

Content Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Massachusetts does not have a state hosted content management system or a state master contract for a content management system available to schools and districts.

Learning Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Massachusetts does not have a state hosted learning management system or state master contract for a learning management system available to schools and districts.

State Resource Repository

Massachusetts does not have a state resource repository.

Funding

Dedicated State Funding

Massachusetts does not have dedicated state funding.

Funding - District Options

Use local funds

Collaborate with other districts

Partner with non-profits

Leverage state purchasing contracts

last update: 5:40 pm 02/23/18
REQUEST CHANGES

Overview

COMMBUYS is the only official procurement record system for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ Executive Departments. COMMBUYS offers free internet-based access to all public procurement information posted here in order to promote transparency, increase competition, and achieve best value for Massachusetts taxpayers. Companies register to sell through COMMBUYS.

More Information

Guidance – Publishers

Massachusetts does not have procurement guidelines for companies interested in selling instructional materials in the state.

Companies register to sell through COMMBUYS, a state-of-the-art electronic Market Center to support online commerce between government purchasers and business.

Guidance – Publishers - Accessibility Features

Massachusetts has guidelines for commercial and OER publishers, developers, and vendors related to accessibility features in products/services.

Specific accessibility requirements must be included in contracts for state agency information technology systems to ensure they can be used by people with disabilities. LEAs must follow federal and any local guidelines. https://www.mass.gov/it-accessibility

Request for Proposals/Request for Information

Massachusetts does not have a request for proposals/request for information process.

State Master Contract - Contract with State

Massachusetts has state master contract available for district and schools to make purchases directly with the state.

Includes

Devices

State Master Contract - Contract with Publisher

Massachusetts does not have state master contract available for district and schools to make purchases directly with the publisher.

State Pricing Negotiation

Massachusetts does not negotiate prices with publishers, vendors during the RFP/RFI process, and districts may purchase the materials directly from the vendor.

Manage Regional Purchasing Consortia

Massachusetts manages regional groups that participate in regional purchasing consortia for instructional materials.

Massachusetts’ Collaboratives are a statewide network of educational service agencies that work together with school districts and schools to develop programs and services to enhance school districts’ operating efficiency, which may include forming regional purchasing consortia.