Instructional Materials

Overview

Procurement of digital materials on the approved state list are available at a rate negotiated by state contract and the procurement of devices is made through a bid or sole source. Funding for textbooks, library books, periodicals, computer software/hardware, consumable/non-consumable media supplies in Oregon continued to be provided through per-pupil allocation (common school fund) that is distributed based upon a formula that accounts for various characteristics such as student characteristics and location. Additional funding for instructional materials and services are provided through local levies, formula grants and federally-distributed resources.

Oregon’s textbook adoption policy covers all core instructional materials. Oregon does not require materials to be purchased and/or evaluated in digital format.

Chapter 581, Division 22, of the Oregon Administrative Rules provides Oregon’s Instructional Materials Adoption. Following adoption by the State Board of Education, school districts must do one of the following annually to assure that they are in compliance with the instructional materials adoption policies:

(1) Select and adopt from the list (ORS 337.050 and OAR 581-022-1640)

(2) Independently adopt instructional materials using the State Criteria (OAR 581-022-1622)

(3) Postpone adoption for up to two years (OAR 581-022-1650).

Oregon encourages the use of new digital instructional materials through professional development provided by the Oregon EdTech Professional Development Cadre.

Guidelines and Policies

Definition for Accessible Instructional/Educational Materials

Oregon has a unique definition or references the federal definition for accessible instructional/educational materials.

Oregon Administrative Rule 581-011-052: Publishers must supply the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Center (NIMAC) with the National Instructional Accessibility Standards (NIMAS) file sets for their contracted instructional materials. School districts adopting instructional materials that have not been evaluated and adopted at the state level (independent adoptions) must provide their local school board with a statement of assurance that the adopted materials comply with the most current NIMAS specifications.

Definition for Accessible Technologies

Oregon has a unique definition for accessible technologies or references the AEM definition for accessible technologies.

Oregon references the federal definitions.

Definition for Digital Instructional Materials

Oregon has a definition for digital instructional materials.

Definition for Instructional Materials/Textbook

Oregon has a definition for instructional materials/textbook that includes the option for digital instructional materials.

Digital instructional materials are included in the definition for instructional materials. Instructional material for purposes of Oregon law is defined as any organized system which constitutes the major instructional vehicle for a given course of study, or any part thereof. A major instructional vehicle may include such instructional items as a hardbound or a softbound book or books, or sets or kits of print and non-print materials, including electronic and internet or web-based materials or media. Basal instructional programs may be adopted by the State Board of Education. Accessible Instructional Materials are required.

Definition for Open Educational Resources

Oregon has an open educational resources definition.

“Open Educational Resources (OER)” are defined as teaching and learning resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.

Guidance for Implementation of Accessible Materials

Oregon provides guidance to LEAs to support the use of accessible digital instructional materials for learners with disabilities to improve outcomes.

Guidance is also provided at state and regional conferences for educational technology/digital learning, special education and administrators.

Guidance Outside of School

Oregon does not provide guidance to LEAs in the use of digital instructional materials outside of the classroom.

Policy - Adoption

Oregon has an adoption policy for digital instructional materials.

Oregon’s adoption policy covers all core instructional materials. Oregon does not require materials to be purchased and/or evaluated in digital format. Districts annually assure that they are in compliance with and implementing Chapter 581, Division 22, of the Oregon Administrative Rules. This page provides guidance to districts for amending the assurance when necessary to include a plan for compliance with OAR 581-022-1640, Instructional Materials Adoption. Following adoption by the State Board of Education, school districts must do one of the following: (1) Select and adopt from the list (ORS 337.050 and OAR 581-022-1640), (2) Independently adopt instructional materials using the State Criteria (OAR 581-022-1622) or (3) Postpone adoption for up to two years (OAR 581-022-1650).

Digital Content Included

Software

Digital Curriculum

Online Content

Policy - Open Educational Resources

Oregon does not have a policy for open educational resources.

Oregon does not have a state policy specific to OER materials, however the state’s instructional material policies permit the implementation of OER.

Policy - Statute for Implementation

Oregon does not have a statute requiring the implementation of digital instructional materials.

Procurement

Guidance - Acquisition of Accessible Digital Instructional Materials

Oregon does not provide information, examples or guidelines to LEAs to support the selection and acquisition of accessible digital instructional materials.

Guidance – Acquisition of Accessible Technologies

Oregon provides information, examples or technical assistance to LEAs to support the selection and acquisition of accessible technologies.

The Oregon Technology Access Program (OTAP) provides training, information, technical assistance and resources regarding the use of technology for children with disabilities. Oregon’s Statewide Assistive Technology Program (ATI) is administered through a team of Certified Assistive Technology Specialists. ATI provides equipment, training, and assistance with selection of devices to people with significant hearing and vision loss.

http://www.douglasesd.k12.or.us/otap/

http://www.accesstechnologiesinc.org/

Guidance – Acquisition of Digital Devices

Oregon does not provide guidance for the purchase of digital devices.

Guidance – Acquisition of Digital Instructional Materials

Oregon does not have procurement guidelines specific to digital instructional materials.

The state does encourage the use of digital instructional materials.

Guidance – Publishers

Oregon has procurement guidelines for companies interested in selling instructional materials in the state.

Oregon does not distinguish between digital and non-digital materials. The process for digital materials is the same process as any other instructional material. Options for districts are to purchase off the state list or adopt independently. In order to get on the state list, a company must submit their materials for review as a part of the State Board of Education schedule for adoptions. Bids for specific content area materials are solicited based on this State Board of Education calendar for adoptions. School districts may adopt and use textbooks or other instructional materials in place of or in addition to those adopted by the State Board of Education provided they meet the guidelines and criteria established by the State Board of Education. Independent adoptions are good for six years.

Guidance – Publishers - Accessibility Features

Oregon does not have guidelines for commercial or OER publishers, developers, or vendors related to accessibility features in products/services.

Manage Regional Purchasing Consortia

Oregon does not manage regional groups that participate in regional purchasing consortia for instructional materials.

Master Contract Digital Devices

Oregon does not have state master purchasing contracts available for districts and schools to purchase digital devices.

Master Contract Instructional Materials

Oregon provides state master purchasing contracts available for districts and schools to purchase instructional materials.

Oregon requires that publishers bid their contract pricing and guarantee that pricing will remain the same (or lower) throughout the contract. The contract also guarantees that the materials will not be sold in other states or US territories at a lower price than they are sold in Oregon and that the materials will remain available for sale throughout the contract period. The price lists for each content area under contract.

Post Adopted Instructional Materials

Oregon posts adopted instructional materials.

Post Instructional Materials Submitted for Bid

Oregon does not post instructional materials submitted for bid.

Procurement Office

Office of Finance and Administration
Funding

Funding for Digital Instructional Materials

Oregon does not have dedicated funds for digital instructional materials.

Districts fund the purchase of digital instructional materials with general state funds and/or local initiatives.

Oregon districts have the option to purchase digital instructional materials with local funds.

Funding for Devices

Oregon does not have dedicated funds for digital devices.

Each district may use general state funds for the purchase of digital devices (hardware).

Funding for Special Purposes

Oregon does not have a funding stream to purchase digital instructional materials for special purposes.

Digital Learning Resources

Content Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Oregon does not have a state hosted content management system or a state master contract for a content management system available to schools and districts.

Learning Management System: State Hosted or State Master Contract

Oregon does not have a state hosted learning management system or state master contract for a learning management system available to schools and districts.

Oregon doesn’t host a learning management system (LMS) however, there is a statewide contract available for school districts to purchase a LMS.

Open Educational Resources

Oregon develops open educational resources.

Oregon does not recommend/endorse open educational resources.

Oregon developed OER materials as a component of the Title IID Enhancing Education Through Technology grants focused on mathematics, English language arts, English language development, science, and STEM. Oregon is also requesting that Title IIB grant recipients develop instructional materials in mathematics or science that are Creative Commons licensed.

State Resource Repository

Oregon has a state resource repository.

Northwest Textbook Depository managed by an independent contractor.

Vetting

Digital Instructional Materials

Oregon has a review process specific to digital instructional materials.

Review of digital instructional materials must meet the guidelines and criteria established by the State Board of Education.

Open Educational Resources

Oregon has a vetting process for open educational resources.

Open Educational Resources are vetted using the same standards and processes as commercial materials.

Instructional Materials

Overview

Oklahoma does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. Districts can purchase digital learning resources using general funds or textbook funds. For the 2016-17 fiscal year, the state legislature did not appropriate any funds for textbooks. The Oklahoma State Department of Education, by law, has a very limited role in the textbook adoption process. The State Department of Education assists the State Textbook Committee in scheduling and securing facilities for meetings, facilitates an interactive forum between the publishers and the State Textbook Committee, and provides guidance to schools about the process for purchasing instructional materials.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Kentucky is a textbook adoption state. Basal textbooks (print or digital) follow state guidelines of review and notification as established by KRS 156.395-476 and 704 KAR 3:445. The State Textbook Commission members (teachers, administrators, and parents/lay persons) manage the review and selection process which includes use of subject specific evaluation instruments to ensure alignment to current standards. Teachers in school districts review materials and make purchasing decisions at the local level. Districts have the flexibility in what they adopt/purchase.

Kentucky provides standards, purchasing contracts, and guidance on the types of devices for accessing digital content. While state funds have been reduced due to the economic climate, Kentucky has funds available to support the purchase of digital instructional materials. Funds, traditionally earmarked for textbooks, were recently recommended to purchase digital content and devices (in order to access digital content). In 2011, it was ruled that textbook monies could be applied to instructional devices (wireless reading devices contingent upon usage of the devices as instructional resources and text readers, not as computers). The funds are flexible in that allotted dollars can be used for textbooks or supplemental materials or funds can be transferred to a general fund to allow flexibility from regulations tied specifically to textbooks. Local education agencies (LEAs) can carryover funds from year to year. LEAs can apply funds to support adoptions in other subject areas than those in the current adoption cycle, including the purchase of wireless reading devices for students to access instructional content.

For more information: http://openhouse.education.ky.gov/

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Maryland does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The state of Maryland allocates funding to each local educational agency who has the authority to determine spending.

Maryland Education Enterprise Consortium, MEEC, has been organized to provide its members opportunities to license the use of education hardware and software at competitive prices. MEEC also provides technology relevant services including training and interaction with the vendor. Members may includes public and private K-12 institutions, institutions of higher education, public libraries, and museums in the state of Maryland. As a state department of education, Maryland is vendor agnostic. However, vendors may present at State-led meetings if they offer free resources or are presenting with multiple vendors with like products.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

In the state of New York, the procurement of devices and instructional materials is decided at the Local Educational Agency (LEA) level. The State Education Agency (SEA) administers funding to support LEA procurements, in the forms of flexibly-used instructional materials State aid, bonds, and grants. Each LEA is responsible for setting its policies and practices in terms of bids, purchases, and contracts. Funding for devices and instructional materials are available through state grants, textbook aid, hardware aid, software aid, and school library materials aid, as well as other sources. There is no legislation that requires adoption of specific textbooks, software, or hardware — these are all decided at the local level — but there is an expectation that materials align to the New York State Learning Standards. In addition, the state hosts EngageNY.org, which provides free, open educational resources, including P-12 ELA and math curriculum modules and professional development resources.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Iowa does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. Districts fund the purchase of digital instructional materials with general state funds and/or local initiatives. The Iowa Department of Education, Iowa Public Television, and Iowa’s Area Education Agencies manage Iowa Learns, a digital repository of teaching and learning resources.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Michigan does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. As of February 2016, Michigan signed on to the USDOE commitment to become a #GoOpen state.

For the past three years, there has been a forecasting process that is supported by the Technology Readiness Infrastructure Grant (TRIG) through the. Michigan Dept. Of Education. The statewide bid process was developed by an Advisory Committee of the Device Purchase Activity of TRIG which is comprised of representatives from each region of the state. The effort will be sustained through a partnership with the Regional Educational Media Center Association of Michigan (REMCAM).

Also, Intermediate School Districts often facilitate regional pricing rates on behalf of their districts. Digital content in K-12 Social Studies is currently being developed under a different activity within the TRIG project. The state has a focus on alignment with student needs within context of Michigan’s Multi-teired Support System. http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-28753_65803-322534–,00.html

 

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Wyoming does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

The New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) is authorized under Sections 22-15-1 through 22-15-31, NMSA, 1978 Compilation, to adopt a multiple list of instructional materials and distribute funds directly to local school districts, charter districts, charter schools, and state supported schools.

The instructional material fund is used to pay for instructional material pursuant to the Instructional Material Law. New Mexico has a textbook review process conducted the first full week of June each year where material is reviewed by highly qualified teachers for alignment with NM content standards and benchmarks and other relevant criteria. The subjects reviewed rotate on a six year cycle. The Secretary of Education approves an adopted multiple list of core basal and supplemental instructional materials. Districts may not expend more than 50% of their instructional material allocations for instructional materials not included on the adopted multiple list. Charter schools have a waiver from this purchase requirement. The Department may conduct a special review if circumstances allow outside of the six year window.

The Instructional Material Fund is used to purchase materials used as the basis for instruction.

The New Mexico online procurement system includes real time notification of solicitations and awards. While there is no state procurement manual, the state does have a target guide and registration system for those wanting to do business with the state and localities.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

The state of South Dakota does not have any state policies, funding, or adoption processes in place. The state encourages districts to implement local policies and processes and to allocate local resources.The state encourages districts to use appropriate tools and process to make decisions to pilot new digital instructional materials.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

In general, Massachusetts does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Districts have the authority to procure and use digital instructional materials. Districts may purchase devices through statewide contracts and fund purchases for devices and/or digital instructional materials through public or private sources. The state has partnered with some organizations to provide digital instructional materials free of charge to educators and communicates the availability of such offerings through channels such as Twitter, the Commissioner’s Weekly Update, the Office of Digital Learning newsletter, and targeted emails.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Indiana does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

In 2009, the State Board took action and included digital content in the textbook definition. The definition of a “textbook” for purposes of reimbursement is the same definition that applies to adoption. Computers and other data devices, instructional software, internet resources, interactive and magnetic media, and other systematically organized materials are eligible for reimbursement. Because computers or other data devices are necessary to deliver the content, the State Board includes them within the definition. A digital curriculum is an instructional resource that consists of both content displayed in a digital manner and interactive activities or lessons that further a student’s understanding of the content. The definition of digital curriculum is broader than just a digital version of a book.

There was a waiver to all districts in 2009 allowing them to spend all or part of the money they previously spent on textbooks to purchase digital content or devices. That waiver became part of state law in 2011. The state encourages the use of digital instructional via the Digital Content Cohort. Teachers from around the state collaborate to curate great digital resources aligned to our Indiana standards. In addition, school corporations have been successful in working with the private sector to purchase devices and digital content. For example, some schools have purchased low cost, content-loaded mini-laptops; others have developed their own materials for use with devices. Districts and schools are encouraged to collaborate to lower the cost of acquisition of textbooks, computers and other data devices, and their content.

The Office of eLearning also supports the implementation of digital instructional materials through multiple grants and professional learning opportunities including the Innovation Planning grants for districts to develop a comprehensive plan to implement digital learning.

 

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Utah does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. Districts may use allotted funds for the purchase of technology as determined by local boards of education. The state provides a Recommended Instructional Materials System (RIMS) which is utilized by most districts, and includes contracted prices that are guaranteed for five years. The Favored Nation Status guarantees district and local education agencies the lowest price offered anywhere in the state. Funding for Digital Learning Resources (DLRs), including hardware and digital curriculum is available through state equipment funds and textbook funds (textbook funds can be used to purchase electronic equipment).

Utah does not have legislation that requires adoption of specific DLRs by the state or localities, but there is an expectation that DLR align to Utahs standards of learning. Utah has a textbook review/approval process that is reviewed by the highly qualified teachers and subject area specialists. All subject areas are reviewed each year, however, districts may choose to use non-state approved textbooks. Reviews of materials are posted on a target website during the 5 year contract period. The Utah State Board of Education approves a recommended list of instructional materials twice yearly as a service to districts in the selection of instructional materials. This procedure is mandated by law since 1907 however, districts are free to select materials that are not on the list. To encourage the implementation of digital instructional materials, Utah has developed OER digital resources and a state driven one-to-one initiative that encourages districts to acquire technology.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

An instructional materials allotment (IMA) for the purchase of instructional materials, technological equipment, and technology-related services was created in 2011 by Senate Bill 6. Each district and open-enrollment charter school is entitled to an IMA, which it uses for local procurement of instructional materials. The IMA is funded from the instructional materials fund, an amount set aside biennially from the payout of the permanent school fund. The payout rate is determined by the State Board of Education (SBOE); the amount of the instructional materials fund is determined through legislative appropriation, and the amount of the IMA is determined by the commissioner based on the legislative appropriation. Districts and open-enrollment charter schools have access to their allotment through EMAT, the instructional materials ordering system. Eligible IMA expenditures include instructional materials, both print and digital, and other kinds of educational technology.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Maine does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. Materials should align with the Maine Learning Results (state content standards). Districts purchase their own instructional materials, but also receive varied levels of state general assistance based on Essential Programs and Services funding model.

The Maine Department of Education sponsors or cosponsors some efforts related to digital instructional materials, including small OER and other curriculum identification & creation initiatives intended to provide model instructional materials. The largest of these efforts is the Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI) which has provided 1-to-1 devices for students and teachers in 7th and 8th grade, since 2001. Currently districts can opt in to MLTI for elementary or high school grades at their own expense. Considered a learning initiative, not just a technology access initiative, MLTI provides leadership development and professional development to teachers focused on learning through technology. MLTI emphasizes learning through technology best practice. The state also enters MOUs with vendor partners identified as offering promising and relevant emerging technologies and services related to major initiatives & priorities.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Nebraska does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level currently. Each school district has the authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. This approach is under review and collaborative solutions are underway to create a more efficient and effective approach in the future.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Delaware does not have textbook adoption policies. Delaware Code Chapter 10, section 1049 provides for the ability of districts to select, purchase, and distribute free of charge such textbooks and other materials of instruction, stationery, furniture, equipment, apparatus and supplies as are necessary to the work of the schools.

Delaware does provide guidance for the district regarding instructional materials including:

The state of Delaware provides funds to support the purchase of instructional materials via 14 Del Code Chapter 17, Section 1706.

In addition, the Delaware Department of Education is implementing a learning management system (LMS) that 55%-60% of the LEAs will use during the 2015-2016 school year to organize high-quality digital instructional materials for use in K-12 schools.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Montana does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Ohio does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The Ohio Department of Education has developed digital instructional materials aligned to the Ohio Learning Standards that provide guidance and support to LEAs in implementing the Learning Standards. The department encourages LEAs via webinars, electronic newsletters and face-to-face meetings to use these resources but also to develop additional digital instructional materials aligned to the Learning Standards that meet the needs of their students.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

In the state of North Carolina, the procurement of devices and instructional materials is determined locally by the individual LEA or Charter School. Districts have flexibility in what they adopt at the local level and leverage the State Board adopted list as a guide. Formats for textbooks may be print or non-print, including hardbound books, softbound books, activity-oriented programs, classroom kits, and technology-based programs that require the use of electronic equipment in order to be used in the learning process.

Through our statewide Instructional Improvement System (IIS) the state is able to purchase statewide licensing to instructional materials that are delivered through the IIS platform. This procurement process follows the requirements for NC state agencies. NC Public School Law (‘_ 115C-89) requires the State Board of Education to make all necessary rules and regulations concerning requests for bids, notification to publishers of calls for adoption, execution and delivery of contracts, requirement of performance bonds, cancellation clauses, and such other material matters as may affect the validity of the contracts.

Funding for digital instructional materials is determined locally by the LEA or Charter School based on how they intend to use the various state funds.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Florida does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The state has state level contracts for state adopted instructional materials but does not procure those materials for districts. The adoption of materials is a statute driven process. There is a five year adoption cycle and all bid materials are reviewed by two state or national content experts (in the event of a tie a third will review). District specialists also provide reviews and the review process is open to the public. All materials are reviewed online.

State statute requires that beginning in the 2015-2016 academic year, all adopted instructional materials for students in kindergarten through grade 12 must be provided in an electronic or digital format. If a district certifies that it has met the obligation to provide digital instructional materials aligned to standards for core courses then the district may use state allocated funds for the purchase of technology.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

In the U.S. territory of Guam, the procurement of devices and instructional materials by state agencies/public schools (Unitarian system in this respect) is dependent upon the amount of the purchase and whether the funds are local or federal funds. Federally funded equipment up to $100,000 is purchased by obtaining three quotes from potential vendors, with the award given to the lowest quote. For larger purchases, Guam Local Law requires a formal bid process. Bids, Indefinite Quantity Bids, RFI’s, and RFP’s, require the approval of the Procurement and Legal Office for Department of Education. IFB’s are awarded by letter and purchase order. Other bids require a contract which is approved by legal counsel, the Attorney General’s Office, and the Office of the Governor before execution. The threshold for local purchases is $50,000 and three quotes are required.

The legislature allocates funding to the Department of Education for digital learning resources, including textbooks and materials as part of the legislative approved Department of Education annual budget allocation.  A Federal Programs Office oversees funding for US Ed. Federal funds including Title V-A Consolidated Grant Programs as well as other discretionary grants. Individual program budgets request funds for digital learning materials (DLM) in their program application to the Federal government. Guam’s procurement office does not handle any purchases for DLM for schools. Instead, all purchases are handled through the Guam Department of Education. The Board of Education adopts textbooks recommended by the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment. All materials are aligned to the Common Core Curriculum or Federally Funded Program goals.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

In Virginia, the procurement of devices and instructional materials by state agencies are completed in two ways separate ways.

1. Procurement of Devices: If the procurement is part of a solicitation for a device purchase for students that requires software to be loaded as part of the purchase, then prior to the purchase the contract must be approved by the Virginia Information Technology Agency (VITA-http://www.vita.virginia.gov). VITA is a state government oversight and monitoring agency.

2. For purchases specific to digital instructional materials at the state or local level, the procurement is conducted through bid or sole source with only departmental or local oversight. If a district solicits bids and purchases digital learning resources (DLR), all other districts in the state can buy off of their contract. Funding for DLR is available through state technology equipment grants (a portion is allocated for DLR), textbook funds (textbook funds can be used to purchase DLRs), specific DLR grants from the Governor or General Assembly, and local funding. There is no legislation that requires adoption of specific DLRs by the state or localities, but there is an expectation that DLR align to Virginias standards of learning. Some larger districts have resource portals with purchased software, OER, and district created resources. Virginia has joined the #GoOpen movement and is actively pursuing the curation and creation of open education resources through a contract with eMediaVA.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

Alabama does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The Alabama Learning Exchange (ALEX) hosts a series of Train the Trainer sessions that focuses upon use of digital content in the classroom. The program is called A.C.E. and embodies an informal certification continuum whereby teachers can earn credentials to facilitate training on each of the ALEX digital learning modules.

Guidelines and Policies
Procurement
Funding
Digital Learning Resources
Vetting
Instructional Materials

Overview

The State of California funds local educational agencies (LEA) with one state entitlement. The LEA will utilize this funding for nearly all state-funded educational expenditures, including instructional materials (Local Control Funding Formula). It is incumbent upon the LEA to determine their own local needs.

LEAs are subject to a law California Education Code (EC) Section 60119, which requires instructional materials to be aligned to the state-adopted academic content standards in the four subjects of English language arts/English language development; history/social science; mathematics; and science. The Instructional Quality Commission, supervises the instructional materials reviews, utilizing state-trained volunteer teachers and administrators, to establish a list of materials meeting 100% of the state-adopted standards in addition to other evaluation criteria. California posts this list of state-adopted programs for LEAs to consider and posts details on requirements for materials via the Curriculum Frameworks Adoption Process – CalEdFacts. LEAs do not have a specific timeline to implement any specific instructional materials. The State conducts such an adoption on an eight-year cycle per subject. LEAs may conduct their own local reviews in consideration of piloting and adopting such materials.

The State Superintendent of Public Instruction (SSPI) encourages California school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to be innovative in the use of technology to improve instruction, student learning, and teacher professional development. The SSPI encourages the use of digital instructional materials to support learning, and the use of technology devices for instruction. The SSPI continues to explore technological innovation in education with public and private sector partners.A local school district governing board may adopt relevant technology-based materials, if the materials are both available and comparable to other, equivalent instructional materials, as defined in education code section 60010 (h). A publisher or manufacturer that submits a printed instructional material for adoption by the state board, or a school district governing board, or for use by the governing board of a school district, on or after January 1, 2014, shall ensure that the printed instructional material is also available in an equivalent digital format during the entire term adoption term. The printed instructional material equivalent digital format shall conform to the most current, ratified standards under the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines – World Wide Web Consortium for accessibility. A revised State Board of Education policy also notes digital instructional material availability.

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Pennsylvania does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

Local Education Agencies (LEAs) seeking to acquire instructional devices and/or digital materials usually do so through local or consortia bid processes, the latter typically managed through Regional Education Agencies (i.e., PA Intermediate Units). LEAs may also purchase through existing state-level agreements with qualifying vendors.

Basic education funding and most other state grants provide purchasing flexibility, allowing for the procurement of instructional technology such as end-user equipment and digital content as long as the purchases support the grant objectives. Pennsylvania LEAs have the ability to select which textbooks and supplementary books they will use, as well as when new texts are needed, provided the materials are adopted at the local level in a manner and time frame consistent with Pennsylvania School Code.

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Rhode Island does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. Procurement is done through a bid or cooperative purchasing agreements. The state has a master price agreement available for districts and libraries for devices. There are no specific state funding streams to support the purchase of digital or other instructional materials. LEAs use local and state funding formula funds for their instructional materials budget. State policies provide the flexibility and freedom for LEAs to work individually with all instructional materials publishers.

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State adopted digital materials are available to schools through the state funding designated for instructional materials. For the current fiscal year, Provisos 1.83 (Technology/Device Pilot) and 1.77 (Digital Materials) provided schools additional funding for digital instructional materials and devices. The State Board of Education has the responsibility and duty to adopt the instructional materials used for instruction in the public schools of South Carolina. Regulations regarding textbooks are posted here. The Department of Education facilitates the process using the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Instructional Materials Adoption regulations which include the bids process for instructional materials.

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The State Textbook and Instructional Materials Quality Commission is responsible for recommending an official list of textbooks and instructional materials to the Tennessee State Board of Education (SBE) for approval based on the state’s approval process. Once the SBE has approved a list of textbooks and instructional materials, it is the responsibility of local boards of education to decide which textbooks and instructional materials to use in their districts. The department administers and coordinates the bidding, reviewing, listing, adoption and approval process for textbooks and instructional materials used by Tennessee schools. The department also implements the rules, policies and procedures established by the Tennessee Textbook and Instructional Materials Quality Commission regarding textbooks and instructional materials.

According to Tennessee Code, a “textbook” or “textbooks” includes “electronic textbook” or “electronic textbooks,” which means computer software, interactive videodisc, magnetic media, CD-ROM, computer courseware, local and remote computer assisted instruction, online service, electronic medium or other means of conveying information to the student or otherwise contributing to the learning process through electronic means. Electronic textbooks may be recommended, adopted and purchased in the same fashion as provided for textbooks in this part.

Districts do have the option to choose to use non-state approved instructional materials.

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Vermont does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The procurement of devices is done locally but in some cases where a state contract is in place it is done via the Division of Buildings and General Services (BGS). Information for these contracts can be found here.

Funding for instructional materials and devices is primarily provided locally, although in some cases federal funds, specifically Title I, are used. The State of Vermont does not have a state level approval/review process for instructional materials. The state’s State Standards Coordinator does assist schools with creating a process for approving instructional materials but does not make recommendations for specific materials.

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In Washington, the procurement of devices and instructional materials is primarily conducted at the local district level. Districts may choose to buy off of state master contracts, as well as make use of optional-buy contracts from several buying consortia, including Digital Edge, Washington Learning Source,  and Washington School Information Processing Cooperative. Funding for digital learning resources (DLR) are available through state basic education funding or local bonds or levies.

The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) partnered with the Washington State School Directors Association (WSSDA) to update the sample school board instructional materials policy to better reflect digital materials and OER. Selecting supplemental DLR content is usually a school, department chair or teacher initiated process and there are no state laws restricting local selection and purchase of DLRs. The WSSDA released an updated model policy and procedure on Course Design, Selection and Adoption of Instructional Materials that reflects 21st century instructional materials that include digital resources and OER. This model policy states that the Superintendent or designee may consider the use of field testing as part of the adoption process and this can provide a flexible opportunity to investigate the effectiveness of instructional materials through careful experimentation for an identified purpose based on student needs. In addition, the state has a state level OER initiative which includes digital OER to support the implementation of digital instructional materials.

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According to WV Code 18-2E-7, the West Virginia legislature recognizes the need for West Virginia students to develop proficiency in twenty-first century content, technology tools and learning skills to succeed and prosper in life, in school and on the job.

The 21st Century Tools for 21st Century Schools Technology Initiative (TFS) provides funding to purchase technology tools, including hardware, software, network cabling, network electronics and related professional development. In addition to the TFS allocations, districts may use Step 7b funds, local funds or grants to purchase technology tools and digital instructional resources. According to WV Code 18-9A-10, funds allocated to county boards under Step 7a of the Public School Support Program (PSSP) are to be used to improve instructional programs according to the county and school improvement plans required by WV Code 18-2E-5 and approved by the State Board.

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Wisconsin does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

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The Kansas State Department of Education does not have authority for LEA digital instruction procurement policies or adoption processes. Each LEA is maintained, developed, and operated by a locally elected board that has responsibility for establishing digital instruction policies. LEAs have funding available for technology education through Perkins.

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In Louisiana, districts make purchases as deemed appropriate locally. Laws which govern state procurement include a competitive bid process that may result in contractual agreements for vendors with materials that are ranked as Tier 1 or Tier 2. Districts may, but are not obligated to, make purchases of materials under a state contract. State contracts allow districts to make purchases without having to solicit and review bids locally.

Districts are provided with state and local funding to cover operational costs through the Minimum Foundation Program (MFP) block grant. Grants may provide funding sources which must be in compliance with conditions of the specific grant. There is no line item allocation provided from the legislature for instructional materials.

Louisiana implements an online instructional review process that provides feedback and rankings that reflect the degree of content alignment with state approved standards. Districts are free to make purchases of instructional materials with or without benefit of the reviews that are designed to support local purchasing decisions. Statute 17.8.2 urges the State Board to express desire to utilize digital instructional materials, review process only examines online/digital instructional materials, but still allows print versions to be purchased by districts.

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Minnesota does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

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Mississippi does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. Mississippi does solicits bids from publishers for titles to be reviewed and subsequently recommended to the State Board of Education. Approved vendors enter into a no-cost contract that allows for uniform costs across districts. The state does not specify a certain amount of funding that must be used by districts to purchase instructional materials. Districts typically use state or local funds to purchase textbooks (print or digital). To provide the highest quality of instructional materials to implement the curriculum frameworks for the schools across the state of Mississippi, the MDE has established a plan for the adoption, purchase, distribution, care and use of textbooks for students in all public schools that is an 18 month process. School districts are not required to purchase textbooks from the adopted list, they must choose materials that align to the standards.

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Missouri does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

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Nevada does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The state does provide minimal funding that may be used to purchase Digital Learning Resources in addition to traditional textbooks and Nevada 21 will provide funding for digital devices. http://www.doe.nv.gov/Legislative/Nevada_Ready_21/

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New Hampshire does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. While the use of digital resources and innovative educational technologies are encouraged, districts are free to decide which resources best meet the needs of the students in their communities. Districts have the flexibility to support digital learning and the state requires that student learning be based on competencies, rather than seat time. The learning standards do require the use of digital resource and media.

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New Jersey is a local control state and does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The use of digital learning practices and resources is encouraged, but districts are free to decide which resources will best meet the needs of their educators and students. In support of digital learning, beginning in September 2015, blended learning modules that are designed to support digital professional development are available at NJCORE.

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North Dakota does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

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The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) reviews and adopts instructional materials based on the standards that schools have the option to purchase. State funds are provided directly for the purchase of instructional materials via a state budget instructional materials line item that includes the option to purchase instructional materials and/or does not prohibit the purchase of digital instructional materials. In addition, state funds are provided directly for the purchase of instructional materials via a state budget instructional materials line item that includes the option to purchase instructional materials and/or does not prohibit the purchase of digital instructional materials. For more information.

 

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In the state of Alaska, the procurement of devices and instructional materials is completed at the local level. There is no legislation that requires adoption of specific Digital Learning Resources (DLRs) by the state or localities, but there is an expectation that DLR align to Alaska’s educational standards. The AASB Consortium for Digital Learning Initiative helps with collaborative purchasing and facilitates an iTunes site for Alaska education.

Alaska’s legislature appropriated $4 million for the Alaska Digital Teaching initiative (DTi) program to encourage the implementation of digital instructional materials and these grants can include the procurement of devices and instructional materials. The Association of Alaska School Boards Consortium for Digital Learning has helped districts partner to purchase digital devices when state funds have been available.

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This state does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

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In Arkansas, state procurement indicates that school district procurement functions under separate laws from those at the state level. Options for digital learning materials procurement is based upon the guidelines and authority formulated by the local school board. These laws are enumerated through A.C.A. §6-21-301 through 306. An example of procurement at the local level is illustrated by reviewing Fayetteville Board of Education meeting notes.

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration does not utilized cooperative contracting vehicles. State procurement develops procurement documents, but ADOE and localities are responsible for development of specifications and administration of contracts/services or resources. Bids solicited by state procurement are published here.

Arkansas does not have a state procurement manual, but does publish extensive information for vendors and conducts monthly procurement classes.

Arkansas students have the opportunity to learn in a quality digital learning environment that will provide a solid foundation for succeeding in a digital world. Our mission is to provide resources and support to schools and stakeholders during the planning, implementation, and evaluation of quality digital learning environments. Beginning with the 2014-2015 school year, every student in Arkansas must take one digital course by the time of graduation per Act 1280.

 

 

 

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Colorado does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

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Connecticut does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The state encourages districts to build and create blended learning courses.

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Georgia does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

Georgia’s Statewide Longitudinal Data System has a resource component called Teacher Resource Link (TRL). TRL provides high quality, vetted, and standards aligned digital resources for teachers to use during instruction. TRL is accessible via the GaDOE “tunnel” in conjunction with SLDS using the single sign-on process. The content is aligned to the Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE).

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In the State of Hawaii, instructional materials are exempt from procurement requirements. However, for English language arts and mathematics, the state has negotiated a statewide purchase contract for the approved, Common Core aligned, instructional materials (digital and hardcopy). The state published the Curriculum Materials Review Summary Report providing an overview of Hawaii’s vetting and selection process. Devices are procured via existing price lists, or other various methods of source selection. There is no separate funding stream for devices and instructional materials.

School principals have significant autonomy over their weighted student formula funds. As part of the States Race to the Top grant, Hawaii conducted multiple reviews of instructional materials for English language arts and mathematics. These reviews resulted in several packages approved for statewide adoption. Moving forward, the state is working with teachers to develop the policies and processes for formal, cyclical reviews of instructional materials.

Schools, however, still have the ability to select alternative instructional materials, provided they align with the Hawaii Common Core. Schools opting to use materials other than those selected by the Department need to file an exception request outlining an implementation plan. The request will be reviewed by a technical committee and approved by the Complex Area Superintendent. See the FAQ for more information.

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Idaho does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements. The state provides some funding in the form of tech grants that some districts have used to provide technology to students. Over the last several years, Idaho has provided instructional materials funds to districts, but these funds are not limited to digital resources. Districts have the right and responsibility to select curriculum, whether hard copy or digital, based upon their independent decision. Materials chosen must be aligned to current Idaho content standards, researched based, and of high quality.

Textbook/material adoption is the right and responsibility of each Idaho district and charter. As a service, the state reviews materials on a 6 year rotating basis and provides an approved list of materials. Materials review is completed in sync with the standards review process. However, this system is rapidly changing and Idaho is modifying the materials review process to address the prevalence of digital resources and OER materials. Local districts are free to choose from the list or use other materials as long as they are research based, aligned and of high quality. The state may from time to time provide grants for purchasing devices which often go hand in hand with the use and subsequent purchase of instructional materials.

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This state does not procure resources for schools or districts on a statewide level. Each school district has the constitutional authority, from state and/or local resources, to procure and use digital resources and innovative educational technologies as they deem appropriate to meet educational goals and requirements.

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